Archives For Passion

In my world, in my words

October 3, 2014

Are you a fan of what I have to offer in terms of content? Or perhaps the jury’s still out on whether I make you laugh…think…care…like I promised I would?

Hi.

Hi.

When I think of the bloggers and online personalities in general whom I like to follow, the thing that always stands out to me is how real they are. They know their niche and they don’t stray from it. When I see their posts arrive in my RSS feed, I know pretty much what to expect before linking into their world.

If you take the time out of your already time-pressed day to read my ramblings, I owe it to you to make every minute count. I hope you know I realize that.

For this reason, I’m asking you to vote on what topic(s) you enjoy reading the most about. Would you take a minute of your time so that I may better use your time?

My mind tends to move a mile a minute – about 50 percent of the time it’s on something really productive. The other 50 percent is dedicated to dreaming up big adventures.

Maternal Media is a productive adventure I began back in February 2012. Thank you for coming along for the ride.

Written by Heidi Woodard

Consider this my first mobile post published on Maternal Media. I’m reporting live from a sports field in middle America, but I imagine this same scene is unfolding across the country.

Sunday youth football league.

Here are a few top-of-mind reminders for everyone out there who knows and loves youth athletes.

1. Some of these kids will leave their sports careers behind by the time they exit grade school. If you, as a parent or coach, could predetermine whether or not a kid’s love of the game would end this year/this game/this play, would you behave any differently?

2. Yes, your job is to teach kids the game. But the truly great mentors teach kids so much more about sports that can be applied off the field.

3. It feels AMAZING when your kid makes the big play. Big plays come and go. Character continues on. So celebrate the little things – helping an opposing player up, constantly hustling, being a leader when times are tough – as much as the big, obvious accomplishments.

4. Don’t let a game make or break your mood. How you react to wins and losses is how your kid will react to triumphs and adversities throughout their formative years.

5. Don’t let a referee’s action or inaction be the excuse for flipping your sh*t. Do you have a clue as to what those guys get paid? Trust me, they don’t take on this role for the money or prestige. They are human and, as such, will make mistakes.

6. No matter what mom or dad yells from the sidelines, kids will only play as hard as their hearts are into it. No amount of yelling or chest thumping will motivate them. Quite the contrary, your huge smile and a simple thumbs up will mean more to him than you know…because…amazingly…

7. Your kid only wants to make you and his coach happy. While you worry about mortgage payments and getting through your work week, your son’s list of priorities is much simpler…but no less important.

8. When the last whistle is blown, hug your child and tell him how extremely proud you are of his effort. Do this no matter if he scores the game-winning touchdown or does something that costs his team the game. Believe me, he knows if he screwed up. You don’t need to belabor the point.

9. If your child looks like he’s not having any fun, remind him that life is more than touchdowns and tackles. If your child looks like he’s having a blast, never forget to remind him to be thankful for this special time in his life.

10. Watch the movie Rudy. Keep perspective.

Written by Heidi Woodard

I read the headline of Dr. Travis Bradberry’s piece on LinkedIn, 9 Things Successful People Won’t Do and my gut reaction was, They probably aren’t reading this stuff like I (routinely) do because they, unlike me, are a more finished product. At least that’s how I perceive successful people to be.

Me? My personal motto is: Enjoy the journey of finding out who you want to be when you grow up.

I know I’m not there yet, but I refuse not to have fun on the ride.

Allow me to slide you my business card in a non-intrusive, non-salesy way.

Allow me to slide you my business card in a non-intrusive, non-salesy way. You don’t even have to suffer through small talk, elevator speeches, or general awkwardness.

I thought Dr. Bradberry’s article was very insightful. It affirmed some things that I believe I already personally practice. An example is that I’ve learned to say no when I know my plate is full. Well, the majority of time I do.

It also brought to light some areas where I need more work. I tend to prioritize perfection, for one, at the risk of not giving adequate attention to what I should be prioritizing in life. The first is an unreachable ideal; the second are people.

Unlike other articles I’ve read about the same topic, this one didn’t assume that everyone’s definition of success is the same.

That unique viewpoint is refreshing.

My definition of success doesn’t involve a fixed dollar amount. While I don’t want to live entirely on ramen noodles, I also don’t mind driving an older car, shopping the clearance rack every now and then, and not reaching the top of the corporate ladder.

My definition of success is knowing, without a doubt, that I’m growing.

If you would describe yourself in much the same way, allow me to offer up this follow-up list: 9 Things People Who Continually Want to Grow Won’t Do.

  • They won’t remain the same and expect to change at the same time.
  • They won’t let mole hills become mountains.
  • They won’t use their mouths more than they use their ears.
  • They won’t be intimidated by or jealous of the experts (in whatever field); instead, they choose to learn from them.
  • They won’t be obsessed with how others perceive them. They know their greatest strengths lie within.
  • They won’t allow naysayers to minimize their efforts. The take real and palpable pride in a job well done.
  • They won’t check Twitter, Facebook, email, and watch TV simultaneously if they need to focus. Have I mentioned it took me over four hours to write this post? #fail
  • They won’t be grouchy. It’s impossible to grow if you’re too busy sucking energy out from everything around you.
  • They won’t take life for granted.

It’s worth repeating that last bullet. I’ve had the chance to watch one of my son’s baseball coaches fight cancer and win, only to have the cancer return. His strength and determination astound me. I asked him what piece of advice he would give on this topic and he replied with a (modified) Yogi Berra quote.

Baseball Cancer is ninety percent mental and the other half is physical.

In my mind, he is successful for making a lasting imprint on me and countless others. He refuses to feel defeated in lieu of everything he’s going through. He is growing, moving forward, kicking ass, and taking names.

So I ask you this: What’s your excuse?

Written by Heidi Woodard